Weather Service Report


111 
AXUS76 KHNX 071757 CCA
DGTHNX
CAC019-029-031-039-043-047-107-241645-

Drought Information Statement
National Weather Service Hanford CA
845 AM PST Wed Feb 22 2017

...THREE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS OF VERY WET WEATHER RELIEVE THE DROUGHT 
ACROSS CENTRAL CALIFORNIA...

SYNOPSIS...

Three consecutive months of above normal precipitation, specifically 
the months of December 2016, January 2017, and the three weeks so 
far this February, have significantly reduced the drought across the 
central California interior. Several Pacific storm systems with 
atmospheric rivers of copious tropical moisture moved through 
central California and brought heavy rainfall to the San Joaquin 
Valley, foothills, and mountains generally below 6000 feet during 
the past few months. Ponding basins in the San Joaquin Valley and 
several of the major reservoirs across central California were full 
or nearly full by the middle of February while rivers and streams 
produced high water flows. The Merced River at Stevinson fluctuated
around flood stage for much of Februrary. It is anticipated that a
gradual restoration of groundwater will occur in the weeks ahead.
A very active spring snowmelt season is likely over the Sierra
Nevada with a continued threat of river flooding in the lower
elevations through April or May.

The California Drought Monitor, released on February 16th, showed 
most of the central California interior at category 0, or D0 
(abnormally dry). Only the southernmost fringe of Kern County and the 
Tulare County portion of the San Joaquin Valley remained in Category 
1, or D1 (moderate drought).

SUMMARY OF IMPACTS...

Precipitation during the past 30 days

Precipitation has averaged much above normal throughout the central 
California interior, or exceeding 150 percent of normal. As of 
February 21st, the percentage of normal snowpack over the southern 
Sierra Nevada was 206 percent of normal.

CLIMATE SUMMARY...

PRECIPITATION...

For the current water year of October 1st through February 21st, 
Fresno received 12.52 inches of rain...which is 5.33  inches above 
the average through February 21st of 7.19 inches. The wettest water 
year to date in Fresno for the period October 1st through February 
21st was in 1969 with a total of 16.81 inches of rain.  

For the current water year of October 1st through February 21st, 
Bakersfield received 7.25 inches of rain, which is 3.20 inches above 
the average rainfall through February 21st of 4.05 inches. The 
wettest water year to date in Bakersfield for the period of October 
1st through February 21st was in 1998 with a total of 8.32 inches of 
rain.

For January, Fresno received 5.50 inches of rain. The normal 
rainfall for the month of January is 2.19 inches.

For January, Bakersfield received 2.76 inches of rain. The normal 
rainfall for the month of January is 1.16 inches.

For December, Fresno received 2.51 inches of rain. The normal 
rainfall for the month of December is 1.77 inches.

For December, Bakersfield received 2.41 inches of rain. The normal 
rainfall for the month of December is 1.02 inches.

TEMPERATURE...

For January, the average temperature in Fresno was 48.1 degrees, 
which is 1.5 degrees above normal.

For January, the average temperature in Bakersfield was 50.1 
degrees, which is 2.3 degrees above normal.

For December, the average temperature in Fresno was 47.1 degrees, 
which is 0.6 degree above normal.

For December, the average temperature in Bakersfield was 49.9 
degrees, which is 2.1 degrees above normal.

YEAR TO DATE...

For the first 52 days of 2017, or January 1st through February 21st,
the average temperature in Fresno was 51.2 degrees which is the 10th
warmest first 52 days on record. The warmest first 52 days in Fresno
occurred in 2014 with an average temperature of 54.0 degrees.

For the first 52 days of 2017, or January 1st through February 21st, 
the average temperature in Bakersfield was 53.5 degrees which is the 
5th warmest first 52 days on record. The warmest first 52 days in 
Fresno occurred in 1978 with an average temperature of 55.1 degrees.

PRECIPITATION/TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK...

The NOAA Climate Prediction Center 6-10 day outlook issued on 
February 21st, 2017 forecasts a 70 percent chance of above normal 
temperature with a 40 percent chance of above normal precipitation 
over the central California interior.

The latest 8-14 day outlook forecasts a 60 percent chance of below 
normal temperatures and a 35 to 40 percent chance of below normal 
precipitation.

The climate prediction outlook for the next 30 days, based on data 
from the current state of the oceans and atmosphere, along with 
climate models, from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center forecasts 
above normal temperatures and slightly above normal precipitation 
over the central California interior.

For the three-month period during March through May 2017, the 
outlook favors near average temperatures and precipitation. Please 
see links below.

HYDROLOGIC SUMMARY AND OUTLOOK...

The Climate Prediction Center indicates that ENSO-neutral conditions 
are present at this time and are expected to continue until at least 
Spring 2017. (ENSO stands for El-Nino Southern Oscillation).

Unless any part of central California returns to D2 Drought Status, 
this will be the final drought information statement issued by the 
National Weather Service San Joaquin Valley Forecast Office.

&&

Related websites...
California Data Exchange Center: 
http://cdec.water.ca.gov/
California-Nevada River Forecast Center: 
http://www.cnrfc.noaa.gov/
Drought Monitor: 
http://drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html
California Drought Page: 
http://watersupplyconditions.water.ca.gov/
Climate Prediction Center:
http://www.cpc.noaa.gov/index.php
National Weather Service Hanford:
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/hnx/
Western Region Climate Center: 
http://www.wrcc.dri.edu


Acknowledgements...

Climate Prediction Center Drought Monitor
Western Region Climate 
Center California-Nevada River Forecast Center
National Weather Service San Joaquin Valley - Hanford
California Department of Water Resources
California State Climatologist
California Office of Emergency Services
U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Cal Fire
The Los Angeles Times - www.latimes.com

Questions and comments: Please refer all questions to 
W-hnx.webmaster@noaa.gov

$$

Durfee/Ochs

weather.gov/hanford

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Western Regional Climate Center, wrcc@dri.edu